Farmers' Museum

Historic Structures - Dimmick House

Dimmick House

Date: 1839

Origin: Norwich, Chenango County, NY

Builder: Unknown

Original owner: Hosea Dimmick (?-1889)

Info: The Dimmick House once stood at 21 Mechanic Street in Norwich. It was built in the Greek Revival style and was once the home of a lockkeeper on the Chenango Canal. Currently being restored, the house will depict life in a middle class home in upstate New York.

Site: 

19th-Century Photography Workshop Offered at The Farmers' Museum

Press Release Category: 
Program and Event Press Releases
Publication Date: 
September 2007
Press Release Contact: 

COOPERSTOWN, N.Y., September 4, 2007—The Farmers’ Museum will offer a one-day workshop on 19th-century photography techniques on Friday, September 28, from 10 am to 4 pm.

Participants will explore the varied processes of photography that arose after its conception in the 1830s. The history of photography, from the camera obscura to the first box cameras, will be covered and participates will create their own sun-exposed cyanotypes during the class (or, if it’s a cloudy day, we will use a light box). Participants will also be shown methods of making transparencies on their modern-day computers that can be combined with historical techniques to create their own unique images at home. Participants are encouraged to bring negatives from home to experiment with techniques during the class.

Kevin Gray, who has been working in 19th-century photographic processes since 2003, will lead the workshop. He received his Bachelor’s of Fine Arts degree at Hartwick College in 2001, and is currently pursuing his Masters of Fine Arts degree at the Art Institute of Boston. His photographs have won numerous awards in local galleries and shows. He also teaches classes on photography at Annie’s Community Darkroom in Middlefield and is the School Programs Coordinator at the Fenimore Art Museum.

The fee for the workshop is $75, materials fee may apply. Advanced registration is required, please call (607) 547-1410 or toll free (888) 547-1450 for information and reservations.

About The Farmers’ Museum
As one of the oldest rural life museums in the country, The Farmers’ Museum in Cooperstown, New York, provides visitors with a unique opportunity to experience 19th-century rural and village life first-hand through authentic demonstrations and interpretative exhibits. The museum, founded in 1943, comprises a Colonial Revival stone barn listed on the National Registrar for Historic Places, a recreated historic village circa 1845, and a working farmstead. Through its 19th-century village and farm, the museum preserves important examples of upstate New York architecture, early agricultural tools and equipment, and heritage livestock. The Farmers’ Museum’s outstanding collection of more than 23,000 items encompasses significant historic objects ranging from butter molds to carriages, hand planes to plows. The museum also presents a broad range of interactive educational programs for school groups, families, and adults that explore and preserve the rich agricultural history of the region, including barnyard activities for children; cheese-making, blacksmithing, and quilt-making workshops for families and adults; and technical workshops for farmers, both professional and amateur.

The Farmers’ Museum’s adjacent sister institution, the Fenimore Art Museum, is home to an exceptionally rich collection of American folk art and American Indian art as well as important holdings in American decorative arts, photography, and twentieth-century art. The museum also offers a range of interactive educational programming for children, families, and adults and organizes and hosts nationally touring art and history exhibitions.

The Farmers’ Museum is located on Lake Road, Route 80, in Cooperstown, across the street from Fenimore Art Museum. Admission is $11 for adults, $9.50 for visitors age 65 and over, and $5 for children age 7 to 12; children 6 and under and members are admitted free. Combination admission tickets that include the Fenimore Art Museum and The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum are also available. The museum is open to the public daily from April through October, with special events throughout the year. For museum hours or general information, please call 1-888-547-1450 or visit www.farmersmuseum.org.

###

For further information or photographs, please contact:
Christine Liggio, Public Relations Office
The Farmers’ Museum/the Fenimore Art Museum
(607) 547-1472/c.liggio@nysha.org

Site: 

Brown's Brewing Company's Oatmeal Stout Takes Overall Favorite at The Farmers' Museum's Hop Pickers' Picnic

Press Release Category: 
Program and Event Press Releases
Publication Date: 
August 2007
Press Release Contact: 

COOPERSOWN, N.Y., August 28, 2007—Brown’s Brewing Company, Troy, New York, claimed the first place award as overall favorite among judges and event attendees for its Oatmeal Stout at The Farmers’ Museum’s Hop Pickers’ Picnic on Saturday, August 25. This evening event, which features handcrafted and micro-brewed beer sampling, live music, hop picking and hops-related demonstrations, drew five New York State microbreweries and close to 20 varieties of ales, lagers, and stouts.

Brown’s traditional English style Oatmeal Stout received favorable ratings from the event’s judges and attendees. Veteran beer judge David Graham said that the stout was a “medium-bodied stout with good oatmeal smoothness and flavor, clean pleasant finish and aftertaste.” The Oatmeal Stout, which is part of Brown’s limited ales and lagers line, took home a Gold Medal at the World Beer Cup held in San Diego, April 2004.

Though awards were not given to second and third place favorites during the event, judges made special mention of Brewery Ommegang’s Abbey Ale, the Belgian brewery’s award-winning first brew, which was inspired by the centuries-old brewing techniques of Belgian trappist monks.

The judges vote in combination with the public vote made Butternuts Brewing Company’s Porkslap Pale Ale, an amber-colored light bodied session ale with a mild hop flavor, the third favorite beer of the evening.

About The Farmers’ Museum
As one of the oldest rural life museums in the country, The Farmers’ Museum in Cooperstown, New York, provides visitors with a unique opportunity to experience 19th-century rural and village life first-hand through authentic demonstrations and interpretative exhibits. The museum, founded in 1943, comprises a Colonial Revival stone barn listed on the National Register for Historic Places, a recreated historic village circa 1845, a late- nineteenth-century Country Fair featuring The Empire State Carousel, and a working farmstead. Through its 19th-century village and farm, the museum preserves important examples of upstate New York architecture, early agricultural tools and equipment, and heritage livestock. The Farmers’ Museum’s outstanding collection of more than 23,000 items encompasses significant historic objects ranging from butter molds to carriages, and hand planes to plows. The museum also presents a broad range of interactive educational programs for school groups, families, and adults that explore and preserve the rich agricultural history of the region.

The Farmers’ Museum is located on 5775 State Hwy. 80, Lake Road, in Cooperstown, NY. Museum admission is $11 for adults, $9.50 for visitors age 65 and over, and $5 for children age 7 to 12; children 6 and under and members are admitted free. From April 1 through May 14 and October 9 through October 31, admission prices are reduced to $9 for adults, $8 for seniors age 65 and over, and $4 for children age 7 to 12. Reduced price combination admission tickets that include the Fenimore Art Museum and The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum are also available. For museum hours or general information, please call 1-888-547-1450 or visit www.farmersmuseum.org.

###

For more information or images, please contact:
Christine Liggio/Public Relations Office
New York State Historical Association
Fenimore Art Museum/The Farmers’ Museum
Phone: (607) 547-1472/E-mail: cliggio@nysha.org

Site: 

Hop Pickers' Picnic to be held at The Farmers' Museum

Press Release Category: 
Program and Event Press Releases
Publication Date: 
August 2007
Press Release Contact: 

COOPERSTOWN, N.Y., August 14, 2007—The Farmers’ Museum will present Hop Pickers’ Picnic, an evening of hand-crafted and micro-brewed beer sampling, live music, food, hop picking and hops-related demonstrations, on Saturday, August 25, from 6 to 9 pm, in celebration of the hops harvest.

Hop production was a defining characteristic of agriculture in Central New York during the latter half of the 19th century. Elements of the wealth produced by the hops industry are evident today in our region’s homes and barns. The Farmers’ Museum continues the tradition of hops harvesting and invites visitors to explore the museum’s Hops Field and Pope Hop Barn during the event. Visitors will learn how hops, an important ingredient in brewing beer, were used domestically in the 19th century, try their hand at picking hops, and learn about the growing and harvesting of hops from our farm staff.

The event features a variety of breweries from the upstate New York region for beer tasting and judging of hand-crafted and micro-brewed beers for guests 21 and over throughout the evening. Some of this year’s breweries include: Brewery Ommegang, Cooperstown Brewing Company, Brown’s Brewing Company, and Anheiser Busch’s specialty line.

Food will be available for purchase including bratwurst, hamburgers, and hotdogs or guests may choose to reserve a hop pickers’ picnic basket in advance or bring their own picnic. Please reserve your picnic by Wednesday, August 22, by calling (607) 547-1495.

Musical entertainment will be provided by the 77th New York Regimental Balladeers, one of the nation’s premier Civil War string bands dedicated to recreating the musical landscape of the nineteenth century. The Balladeers use the original Civil War music arrangements and lyrics to convey the thoughts, motives, and sorrows of the men and women who lived during the most defining periods of our American heritage. The group has been recognized by the U.S. Department of the Interior, Gettysburg National Military Park on several occasions for their outstanding and authentic portrayal of the music of the period.

Admission, which includes beer sampling, music, and hops-related demonstrations, is $15 for adults 21 and over, $7.50 for ages 6 – 20, and free for children 5 and under. Please call The Farmers’ Museum toll-free at (888) 547-1450 for more information.

About The Farmers’ Museum
As one of the oldest rural life museums in the country, The Farmers’ Museum in Cooperstown, New York, provides visitors with a unique opportunity to experience 19th-century rural and village life first-hand through authentic demonstrations and interpretative exhibits. The museum, founded in 1943, comprises a Colonial Revival stone barn listed on the National Registrar for Historic Places, a recreated historic village circa 1845, and a working farmstead. Through its 19th-century village and farm, the museum preserves important examples of upstate New York architecture, early agricultural tools and equipment, and heritage livestock. The Farmers’ Museum’s outstanding collection of more than 23,000 items encompasses significant historic objects ranging from butter molds to carriages, hand planes to plows. The museum also presents a broad range of interactive educational programs for school groups, families, and adults that explore and preserve the rich agricultural history of the region, including barnyard activities for children; cheese-making, blacksmithing, and quilt-making workshops for families and adults; and technical workshops for farmers, both professional and amateur.

The Farmers’ Museum’s adjacent sister institution, Fenimore Art Museum, is home to an exceptionally rich collection of American folk art and American Indian art as well as important holdings in American decorative arts, photography, and twentieth-century art. The museum also offers a range of interactive educational programming for children, families, and adults and organizes and hosts nationally touring art and history exhibitions.

The Farmers’ Museum is located on Lake Road, Route 80, in Cooperstown, across the street from Fenimore Art Museum. Admission is $11 for adults, $9.50 for visitors age 65 and over, and $5 for children age 7 to 12; children 6 and under and members are admitted free. Combination admission tickets that include the Fenimore Art Museum and The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum are also available. The museum is open to the public daily from April through October, with special events throughout the year. For museum hours or general information, please call 1-888-547-1450 or visit www.farmersmuseum.org.

###

For more information or images, please contact:
Christine Liggio/Public Relations Office
New York State Historical Association
Fenimore Art Museum/The Farmers’ Museum
Phone: (607) 547-1472/E-mail: cliggio@nysha.org

Site: 

Walk on the Wild Side

Grade Level: 
4th to 7th

WALK ON THE WILD SIDE WORKSHOP

Grade Level: PreK to 1st
Duration: 2 hours

Using the various murals, relief carvings and animals of the Empire State Carousel, students will take a ride through the history of New York State. They will learn the important people, places and species that make New York special. The students will reflect on, interpret and evaluate the carousel as folk art and have the opportunity to explain its cultural and historic dimensions. Students will also create their own clay animal to take home.

School Program Type: 
workshop
Duration: 
2 hours
On or off site (for workshops): 
On-site
Site: 

The Farmers' Museum Offers Master Crafts Workshops

Press Release Category: 
Program and Event Press Releases
Publication Date: 
July 2007
Press Release Contact: 

COOPERSTOWN, NY, July 27, 2007—From August 3 through September 9, The Farmers’ Museum will offer a series of three and two-day Master Crafts workshops in tinsmithing, country tin and theorem painting, and family records.

Tinsmithing 101 for Beginners
August 3

Instruction will include all the hand tools, forming stakes, swedges and hand-operated machines used in a well-equipped 19th-century tin shop. Each student will be shown how to do basic layout work, cutting, forming assembly and soldering and will make a finger candlestick and wall sconce.

TIN 102 for Apprentices & Journeyman
August 10 and 11

Once you have had the basics this course allows you to explore other processes like wiring, turning, burring, raising and hollow ware construction. You may not have all the special tools available to make what you want in your home shop but all of these will be available here. Each student will discuss the piece they want to build at the beginning of the class to see if it is within their skill level. (Hundreds of pieces are available to choose from). One or two examples can be made as time permits. Very advanced pieces, including crooked spout coffee pots, reflector ovens and Argand lamps are excluded.

Both of these workshops will be held from 9 am to 4 pm in a fully equipped, 19th century tinshop, in Ballston Lake, NY, Saratoga County. The fee for TIN 101 and 102 is $75.00/day plus $15.00 materials fee. Each student will have their own bench and all tools will be provided. Students are asked to bring their own lunch.

The next three workshops are made possible by the generous support of the Historical Society of Early American Decoration, an organization dedicated to preserving America’s craft heritage since 1946.

Country Tin Painting
August 10, 11, & 12

Country Tin Painting is one of the few decorative painting arts truly indigenous to America. Tin Peddlers of the early 1800s began having their wares painted, often employing family members to brighten up the housewife’s kitchen shelves. What began in Connecticut quickly spread to tinshops throughout the Northeast. Cooperstown’s neighboring village of Fly Creek was home to Stephen North, one of the tradition’s most important early artisans. Decorative artist and teacher Anne Dimmock of Trumansburg, New York, whose many years of training reflect the standards of the Historical Society of Early American Decoration, will guide students through techniques including background preparation, the brush stroke, paints and colors found in the designs and finishes. You will learn about the history of the craft, see some original examples and will work towards completing a practice piece during our time together. The fee for this workshop is $185.00, plus a $60.00 materials fee.

Introduction to Theorem Painting
August 24, 25, & 26

Enjoying a revival along with other early folk art and early New England school girl art forms (those taught in young girl academies in early 1800s) is Theorem Painting. Theorem Painting involves a process of using oil tube paints and a set of overlay stencils to create a picture. This class is intended for those who have never tried Theorem Painting and for those Theorem painters who wish to review or enhance their Theorem Painting skills. The complete series of skills and techniques required to become a theorem artisan will be introduced: cutting stencils, mounting velvet and applying color plus instruction in proper framing. Fee: $180.00 plus a $25.00 materials fee

Family Record Workshop
September 7,8, & 9

Hand drawn and colored Family Records were both important documents and delightful decorative arts in Early America. This class will introduce basic calligraphy and simple design options for creating various types of family records. The workshop will be led by Helga Johnson, a member of the Historical Society for Early American Decoration who has been a certified instructor for the organization for many years. One of her interests is the art of the Fraktur, which is associated with the Pennsylvania Germans. She has done many adaptations of Wedding, Baptismal, and House Blessing frakturs. Fee: $180.00 plus a $30.00
All workshops are held at The Farmers’ Museum except for Tinsmithing 101 and 102, which will be held in Ballston Lake, NY, Saratoga County. Registration is required for all workshops, call (607) 547-1450, ext. 410 or toll-free (888) 547-1450 for information and reservations.

About The Farmers’ Museum
As one of the oldest rural life museums in the country, The Farmers’ Museum in Cooperstown, New York, provides visitors with a unique opportunity to experience 19th-century rural and village life first-hand through authentic demonstrations and interpretative exhibits. The museum, founded in 1944, comprises a Colonial Revival stone barn listed on the National Register for Historic Places, a recreated historic village circa 1845, a late nineteenth century Country Fair featuring The Empire State Carousel, and a working farmstead. Through its 19th-century village and farm, the museum preserves important examples of upstate New York architecture, early agricultural tools and equipment, and heritage livestock. The Farmers’ Museum’s outstanding collection of more than 23,000 items encompasses significant historic objects ranging from butter molds to carriages, hand planes to plows. The museum also presents a broad range of interactive educational programs for school groups, families, and adults that explore and preserve the rich agricultural history of the region.

The Farmers’ Museum is located on 5775 State Hwy. 80, Lake Road, in Cooperstown, NY. Museum admission is $11 for adults, $9.50 for visitors age 65 and over, and $5 for children age 7 to 12; children 6 and under and members are admitted free. Reduced price combination admission tickets that include the Fenimore Art Museum and The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum are also available. The museum is open to the public daily from April 1 through October 31, with special events throughout the year. For museum hours or general information, please call 1-888-547-1450 or visit www.farmersmuseum.org.

###

For more information or images, please contact:
Christine Liggio/Public Relations Office
New York State Historical Association
Fenimore Art Museum/The Farmers’ Museum
Phone: (607) 547-1472/E-mail: cliggio@nysha.org

Site: 

Pages